$325 wood fired pizza oven

Started by PZ, September 25, 2013, 10:40:52 PM

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PZ

I ran across this little gem tonight - it appears to be sold out, but appears to be a solid unit: http://uuni.net/products/uuni-pizza-oven

There is nothing like wood fired pizza - the aromas, the fire, the friendship... it is truly an experience to be treasured.  Although we have a more traditional style stoneware oven, this is definitely a unit that we would consider if we were living in more confined spaces like an apartment with a small balcony.


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Art Blade

Oh my gosh, the guy who took the top photo made it look like a coffin-shaped grand piano with candles, and "oven" made me think of a crematorium.  :laugh:

I'm just glad you came up with that vid the still pic of which at least shows the size in relation to a bod.. a human.  :-D
[titlebar]Vision without action is a daydream. Action without vision is a nightmare.[/titlebar]What doesn't kill us, makes us weirder.

PZ


Binnatics

Funny looking thing indeed.  ^-^

It seems to w@&k pretty fine, but I wonder how long it will last. Seems to take a bit of practice and timing. I think I'll stick to my weber with pizza stone for now :-D

Btw, I found a much more relaxing way of creating pizzas in the weber thing. I tried to first fry the crust and then, when all crusts are finished, it's much easier to put the topping on them and bake them off. The result is remarkable, because the crust get's very crunchy and airily. The big effort is that you don't need to hurry when putting the topping on the base. Normally, when the base is still dough, it gets soaked by the sauce etc very fast and thick toppings may result in loosing half of it along the way to the pizza stone :-[. This phased workaround gave me much joy and a surprisingly good taste ^-^ :-X
"Responsibility is not a matter of giving or taking, responsibility is something you share" -Binnatics

PZ

That sounds good - when we grill our pizza, we do one side directly on the grates, then turn it so we are placing the toppings on the cooked surface, which is still so hot that the toppings quickly cook.  We quit using the stone on the grill because the pizzas cook so quickly for us, and we can pump them out for our guests.

Binnatics

I Don't understand what you mean with pumping them out but I did think of your grilled pizza method indeed. That's also a cool strategy. The only difficulty I found during this pre-cooking the base is that it will produce huge bubbles when on the stone without toppic. But if you quickly prick them you can plane the base a bit. When the topping is one, you don't notice anything and it does make the crust airily
"Responsibility is not a matter of giving or taking, responsibility is something you share" -Binnatics

PZ

Quote from: Binnatics on October 02, 2013, 05:20:09 AM
I Don't understand what you mean with pumping them out ...

lol, sorry, a colloquialism I sometimes use to generate the idea of items rapidly coming off an assembly line  :-D

Art Blade

[titlebar]Vision without action is a daydream. Action without vision is a nightmare.[/titlebar]What doesn't kill us, makes us weirder.

nexor

Quote from: Binnatics on October 02, 2013, 05:20:09 AM
I The only difficulty I found during this pre-cooking the base is that it will produce huge bubbles when on the stone without toppic.

Maybe you leave it too long Binn, a commercial oven get pretty damn hot, and when we did our pizza basis I put the base in the oven and the moment the bubbles start  remove and put one side to cool down, the bubbles will even out, you can do as many basis as you need, once they are "proved" the actual pizza making goes quick.

Binnatics

You are right Nex. It's a matter of time before the bubbling appears and before they harden out. The problem is that the Weber has a solid tap, so I can't see what's happening. I need to check after a short while, and when I'm late I'm late :-D

I do like the direct approach best, but maybe it's an idea to fine tune the process, and leave the crust just 10 or 20 seconds in before doing the topping. When spring comes to full burst I'll continue experimenting for sure :)
"Responsibility is not a matter of giving or taking, responsibility is something you share" -Binnatics

PZ

Quote from: nexor on February 06, 2014, 07:36:35 AM
Maybe you leave it too long Binn, a commercial oven get pretty damn hot, and when we did our pizza basis I put the base in the oven and the moment the bubbles start  remove and put one side to cool down, the bubbles will even out, you can do as many basis as you need, once they are "proved" the actual pizza making goes quick.

My wife uses a large fork used to carve roasts to poke at the bubbles - it has very sharp tines.

nexor

The best way is to time it Binn, the pizza oven I had was very hot and a minute was enough, it can always go back for another few seconds

Binnatics

You're right Nex, I'm looking forward to continue experimenting with it ^-^

It's still a bit too rainy though :-\\
"Responsibility is not a matter of giving or taking, responsibility is something you share" -Binnatics

nexor

I like that uuni-pizza-oven PZ, would like to know how the burning of the wood chips works and where the fan is situated, otherwise it looks fairly easy to construct.
Just installed a new bigger oven in our kitchen, contemplating in getting the proper Industrial electric pizza oven ceramic tile to use in the oven, it's just hell expensive

PZ

There is a small reservoir of pellets at the back of the unit, which is gravity fed.  The fan is also at the back and appears to be a small battery-powered unit.  The flames lick the ceiling of the unit, and hot air circulates beneath the floor.  It evidently becomes hot enough to do a pizza in a minute or two.  One of the chaps on a BBQ forum I frequent also cooks other wood fired items like steaks - look very good.

nexor

The concept puzzles me a bit, in one of the clips you can actualy see the flames on the inside and they not small, going to have a chat with my farther-in-law, he might have an idea.

PZ

Sounds interesting, nex, let me know what he thinks.

Love your new avatar

Binnatics

Indeed nice avatar Nex!! It's a real Nexor-tar ^-^ :-X

I experimented yesterday with my pizza stone. I put it in my electric oven and warmed it up to 250°C. I used it to pre-cook my crusts, and checked how long it would take to make them bubble up. I can vary between 30 seconds (which is enough to make them solid, sweaty) and something like 90 seconds, which makes them grow with huge bubbles but still keep them soft enough to gently decorate with sauce, cheese and the rest :)

When returning the charged crust in the oven, I varied with the total baking time again. I started baking the first for around 6 minutes. It was still soft, but enough baked. I put some pieces of smoked cheese, Caciocavallo-like, in small dices. They were close to melting.
The second and third I left inside for longer, close to 10 minutes. The crust became very crunchy, without becoming hard. More like crisps. The smoked cheese dices looked like about to explode, and the smokey flavor mixed perfectly with the rest of the ingredients.

For a first time to use my pizza stone in the electric oven it was a great success. If fact, I don't think I will ever return to the metal pizza tablets I have. Pre-baking the crust makes it possible to load all pizzas before baking them off, so you don't have to be busy in between the pizzas, which is much more pleasant for the cook :-D

Thank you guys for inspiring me experimenting with the pizza stone :-X ^-^
"Responsibility is not a matter of giving or taking, responsibility is something you share" -Binnatics

Art Blade

I believe that he used to use that penguin avatar some time ago, already.
[titlebar]Vision without action is a daydream. Action without vision is a nightmare.[/titlebar]What doesn't kill us, makes us weirder.

PZ

I think you are correct, AB

Binn, we use a stone as well in the indoor oven, and when it looks like the bottom of the crust is done, we take the stone out and place it on top of the stove.  We then flip the crust upside down and load what was the bottom of the crust with our toppings - this causes the bubble side of the crust to flatten somewhat as the weight of the toppings press down, and if necessary, we use our hands to press down any remaining high spots

nexor

Yes, I have used it before   :-X

Binnatics

Like I thought; a real Nexar-tor.  Errr... Nexor-tar. Anyway, love it :-D :-X

"Responsibility is not a matter of giving or taking, responsibility is something you share" -Binnatics

nexor


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